https://www.wired.com/story/rhythm-games-indie-comeback preview's
Are Rhythm Games Ready for a Comeback?

Big publishers stepped away from the genre that spawned Guitar Hero and Rock Band. But a few small studios—and hungry fans—are keeping the dream alive.
2022-01-20 09:15:05
https://science.slashdot.org/story/22/01/20/0153228/antimicrobial-resistance-now-a-leading-cause-of-death-worldwide-study-finds?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Antimicrobial Resistance Now a Leading Cause of Death Worldwide, Study Finds

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to humanity, health leaders have warned, as a study reveals it has become a leading cause of death worldwide and is killing about 3,500 people every day. More than 1.2 million -- and potentially millions more -- died in 2019 as a direct result of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, according to the most comprehensive estimate to date of the global impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The stark analysis covering more than 200 countries and territories was published in the Lancet. It says AMR is killing more people than HIV/Aids or malaria. Many hundreds of thousands of deaths are occurring due to common, previously treatable infections, the study says, because bacteria that cause them have become resistant to treatment. The new Global Research on Antimicrobial Resistance (Gram) report estimates deaths linked to 23 pathogens and 88 pathogen-drug combinations across 204 countries and territories in 2019. Statistical modeling was used to produce estimates of the impact of AMR in all locations -- including those with no data -- using more than 470m individual records obtained from systematic literature reviews, hospital systems, surveillance systems, and other data sources. The analysis shows AMR was directly responsible for an estimated 1.27 million deaths worldwide, and associated with an estimated 4.95 million deaths, in 2019. HIV/Aids and malaria have been estimated to have caused 860,000 and 640,000 deaths, respectively, in 2019. While AMR poses a threat to people of all ages, young children were found to be at particularly high risk, with one in five deaths attributable to AMR occurring in children under the age of five. Some of the actions policymakers can take, as mentioned in the report, include "optimizing the use of existing antibiotics, taking greater action to monitor and control infections, and providing more funding to develop new antibiotics and treatments." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2022-01-20 08:15:01
https://www.wired.com/story/photography-artificial-intelligence-technology preview's
Are You Sure You Know What a Photograph Is?

Once, I thought I had a definition of photography. Today, surrounded by thermal cameras, lidar, 3D printers, and AI software, I am not so sure.
2022-01-20 08:15:01
https://www.wired.com/story/why-big-tech-quiet-texas-abortion-law preview's
Why Big Tech Companies Have Been Quiet on Texas’ Abortion Law

As the anniversary of Roe v. Wade nears, pressure is building from advocacy groups and workers themselves.
2022-01-20 08:15:01
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1825485 preview's
Keychron K14 review: The rare Mac-ready wireless mechanical keyboard

Good wireless features for the price, but the keycaps could use some work.
2022-01-20 08:00:06
https://www.wired.com/story/too-good-to-go-app-food-waste preview's
Grab a Snack—and Combat Food Waste—With This App

Too Good To Go's affordable Surprise Bags are filled with treats made from surplus food from local restaurants and grocery stores.
2022-01-20 07:15:01
https://www.wired.com/story/simulation-tech-global-threats-prediction preview's
Simulation Tech Can Help Predict the Biggest Threats

In the face of myriad global problems, Single Synthetic Environments will make life and death decisions easier to navigate.
2022-01-20 07:15:01
https://it.slashdot.org/story/22/01/20/0148215/red-cross-begs-hackers-not-to-leak-data-of-highly-vulnerable-people?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Red Cross Begs Hackers Not To Leak Data of 'Highly Vulnerable People'

The Red Cross has disclosed that it was the victim of a cyber attack and has asked the hackers who broke into the IT network of one of its contractors not to leak the personal information of more than 515,000 of "highly vulnerable people." The Record reports: The data was stolen from a Red Cross program called Restoring Family Links, which aims to reunite family members separated by conflict, disaster, or migration. "While we don't know who is responsible for this attack, or why they carried it out, we do have this appeal to make to them," said Robert Mardini, director-general for the International Committee of the Red Cross. "Your actions could potentially cause yet more harm and pain to those who have already endured untold suffering. The real people, the real families behind the information you now have are among the world's least powerful. Please do the right thing. Do not share, sell, leak or otherwise use this data," Mardini said. "While we don't know who is responsible for this attack, or why they carried it out, we do have this appeal to make to them," said Robert Mardini, director-general for the International Committee of the Red Cross. "Your actions could potentially cause yet more harm and pain to those who have already endured untold suffering. The real people, the real families behind the information you now have are among the world's least powerful. Please do the right thing. Do not share, sell, leak or otherwise use this data," Mardini said. "The people affected include missing people and their families, unaccompanied or separated children, detainees and other people receiving services from the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement as a result of armed conflict, natural disasters or migration," the organization said in an email. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2022-01-20 05:15:02
https://science.slashdot.org/story/22/01/20/0142209/something-in-your-eyes-may-reveal-if-youre-at-risk-of-early-death-study-shows?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Something In Your Eyes May Reveal If You're At Risk of Early Death, Study Shows

A quick and pain-free scan of the human eyeball could one day help doctors identify "fast agers," who are at greater risk of early mortality. ScienceAlert reports: A machine learning model has now been taught to predict a person's years of life simply by looking at their retina, which is the tissue at the back of the eye. The algorithm is so accurate, it could predict the age of nearly 47,000 middle-aged and elderly adults in the United Kingdom within a bracket of 3.5 years. Just over a decade after these retinas were scanned, 1,871 individuals had died, and those who had older-looking retinas were more likely to fall in this group. For instance, if the algorithm predicted a person's retina was a year older than their actual age, their risk of death from any cause in the next 11 years went up by 2 percent. At the same time, their risk of death from a cause other than cardiovascular disease or cancer went up by 3 percent. The findings are purely observational, which means we still don't know what is driving this relationship at a biological level. Nevertheless, the results support growing evidence that the retina is highly sensitive to the damages of aging. Because this visible tissue hosts both blood vessels and nerves, it could tell us important information about an individual's vascular and brain health. The study was published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2022-01-20 02:15:02
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/22/01/19/2159227/social-media-bans-of-scientific-misinformation-arent-helpful-researchers-say?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Social Media Bans of Scientific Misinformation Aren't Helpful, Researchers Say

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: The Royal Society is the UK's national academy of sciences. On Wednesday, it published a report on what it calls the "online information environment," challenging some key assumptions behind the movement to de-platform conspiracy theorists spreading hoax info on topics like climate change, 5G, and the coronavirus. Based on literature reviews, workshops and roundtables with academic experts and fact-checking groups, and two surveys in the UK, the Royal Society reached several conclusions. The first is that while online misinformation is rampant, its influence may be exaggerated, at least as far as the UK goes: "the vast majority of respondents believe the COVID-19 vaccines are safe, that human activity is responsible for climate change, and that 5G technology is not harmful." The second is that the impact of so-called echo chambers may be similarly exaggerated and there's little evidence to support the "filter bubble" hypothesis (basically, algorithm-fueled extremist rabbit holes). The researchers also highlighted that many debates about what constitutes misinformation are rooted in disputes within the scientific community and that the anti-vax movement is far broader than any one set of beliefs or motivations. One of the main takeaways: The government and social media companies should not rely on "constant removal" of misleading content [because it is] not a "solution to online scientific misinformation." It also warns that if conspiracy theorists are driven out of places like Facebook, they could retreat into parts of the web where they are unreachable. Importantly, the report makes a distinction between removing scientific misinformation and other content like hate speech or illegal media, where removals may be more effective: "... Whilst this approach may be effective and essential for illegal content (eg hate speech, terrorist content, child sexual abuse material) there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of this approach for scientific misinformation, and approaches to addressing the amplification of misinformation may be more effective. In addition, demonstrating a causal link between online misinformation and offline harm is difficult to achieve, and there is a risk that content removal may cause more harm than good by driving misinformation content (and people who may act upon it) towards harder-to-address corners of the internet." Instead of removal, the Royal Society researchers advocate developing what they call "collective resilience." Pushing back on scientific disinformation may be more effective via other tactics, such as demonetization, systems to prevent amplification of such content, and fact-checking labels. The report encourages the UK government to continue fighting back against scientific misinformation but to emphasize society-wide harms that may arise from issues like climate change rather than the potential risk to individuals for taking the bait. Other strategies the Royal Society suggests are continuing the development of independent, well-financed fact-checking organizations; fighting misinformation "beyond high-risk, high-reach social media platforms"; and promoting transparency and collaboration between platforms and scientists. Finally, the report mentions that regulating recommendation algorithms may be effective. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2022-01-19 22:45:02