https://www.wired.com/story/streaming-games-actually-started-the-80s preview's
Streaming Games to Your TV Actually Started in the '80s

Subscription video gaming services seem like a new idea. But 40 years before Game Pass, you could get Burgertime straight to your tube.
2021-06-15 08:15:01
https://www.wired.com/story/ghosts-n-goblins-resurrection preview's
Ghosts ‘n Goblins Is Back—Pain, Laughs, and All

One of the most unforgiving video game series of all time has risen from the dead, and it’s better than ever.
2021-06-15 08:15:01
https://www.wired.com/gallery/books-summer-reading-recommendations-kids-teens-2021 preview's
WIRED's Ultimate Summer Reading List 2021: Books for Kids and Teens

This surreal school year is finally over. Here are some books to get your young readers in the swing of the season.
2021-06-15 07:15:03
https://www.wired.com/story/can-remote-tech-save-lives preview's
What If Doctors Are Always Watching, but Never There?

Remote technology could save lives by monitoring health from home or outside the hospital. It could also push patients and health care providers further apart.
2021-06-15 07:15:03
https://www.wired.com/story/how-humans-think-when-they-think-group preview's
How Humans Think When They Think As Part of a Group

The fancy word for it is "entitativity," and it’s produced when people act and feel together in close proximity. We need it more, but we’re getting it less.
2021-06-15 07:15:03
https://science.slashdot.org/story/21/06/14/2250210/plexiglass-is-everywhere-with-no-proof-it-keeps-covid-at-bay?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Plexiglass Is Everywhere, With No Proof It Keeps Covid at Bay

Sales of plexiglass tripled to roughly $750 million in the U.S. after the pandemic hit, as offices, schools, restaurants and retail stores sought protection from the droplets that health authorities suspected were spreading the coronavirus. There was just one hitch. Not a single study has shown that the clear plastic barriers actually control the virus, said Joseph Allen of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. From a report: "We spent a lot of time and money focused on hygiene theater," said Allen, an indoor-air researcher. "The danger is that we didn't deploy the resources to address the real threat, which was airborne transmission -- both real dollars, but also time and attention. The tide has turned," he said. "The problem is, it took a year." For the first months of Covid-19, top health authorities pointed to larger droplets as the key transmission culprits, despite a chorus of protests from researchers like Allen. Tinier floating droplets can also spread the virus, they warned, meaning plastic shields can't stop them. Not until last month did the World Health Organization and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention fully affirm airborne transmission. That meant plastic shielding had created "a false sense of security," said building scientist Marwa Zaatari, a pandemic task force member of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2021-06-15 07:15:02
https://news.slashdot.org/story/21/06/14/2230246/microsofts-smith-says-secret-subpoenas-hurt-us-tech-companies?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed preview's
Microsoft's Smith Says Secret Subpoenas Hurt US Tech Companies

Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith criticized secret data subpoenas sent by the government to cloud providers like his company and Apple, saying gag orders on requests for personal information undermine freedoms and are hurting U.S. technology companies in Europe. From a report: Last week the New York Times reported that during the administration of former President Donald Trump, the U.S. Department of Justice demanded records from Apple relating to two Democrats on the U.S. House Intelligence Committee. CNBC reported Microsoft received a confidential request for the personal emails of a Congressional staffer. Both companies were under nondisclosure orders that prevented them from talking about or alerting the subjects of the data seizures. The U.S. government should change the rules so that people whose data is being demanded can be informed and choose whether to file a legal challenge to the subpoenas, Smith said Monday in an interview with Bloomberg Television. Microsoft in 2016 filed a case against the DOJ related to the gag orders, and a year later the department issued new guidelines it said would scale back the practice of these kinds of confidential requests. "If we fail to do so, we undermine longstanding fundamental freedoms in the country and, frankly, for those of us in the tech sector, we're put in the middle," Smith said. "This should be an issue where the government has to go most of the time to the individuals whose information they are seeking." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
2021-06-15 02:15:02
https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/50005 preview's
[local] Brother BRPrint Auditor - 'Multiple' Unquoted Service Path

Brother BRPrint Auditor - 'Multiple' Unquoted Service Path
2021-06-15 00:00:00
https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/50010 preview's
[local] Brother BRAgent 1.38 - 'WBA_Agent_Client' Unquoted Service Path

Brother BRAgent 1.38 - 'WBA_Agent_Client' Unquoted Service Path
2021-06-15 00:00:00
https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/50009 preview's
[local] SysGauge 7.9.18 - ' SysGauge Server' Unquoted Service Path

SysGauge 7.9.18 - ' SysGauge Server' Unquoted Service Path
2021-06-15 00:00:00